Archives par étiquette : British Columbia

BC Empty Gifts like Empty Promises: ACORN Members Rally for Disability Rights

ACORN Canada | December 29, 2014

In British Columbia, single parents on income and disability assistance have every dollar of their monthly child support payments clawed back from their assistance cheques. Since 2013, BC ACORN members have been campaigning tirelessly to get the government to end this controversial policy, and after over a year of consulting with organizations, families, parents, and other stakeholders, on December 10, 2014 the government requested yet further consultations before making any decision on the matter.

[Read the full story here]

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Caring for baby Kelel

Smithers Interior News | December 15, 2014, Written by Chris Gareau

Four-month-old Kelel’s home has been turned into a triage centre. Equipment just to keep the boy named after Superman breathing and feeding fills the Smithers home dad Joe Bramsleven describes as a “bubble,” quarantined from illnesses from visitors that would be fatal.

Kelel has a rare genetic disorder: spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). He has Type 1, the harshest diagnosis that carries with it a life expectancy of one to two years. Survival beyond the third year is very rare. It takes 24-hour care to keep Kelel alive.

[Read the full story here]

Kelel with his big brother Dominick. Kelel has already been medevaced four times. - Contibuted

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Getting the Message

Prince George Citizen | October 25, 2014, Written by Christine Hinzmann

October is Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) awareness month. When people can’t speak due to a disability, different types of communication other than speech are used, including paper systems with keyboards, books with words or pictures or electronic equipment. People in Prince George and elsewhere in the province can access equipment through Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults (CAYA).

[Read the full story here]

Alternative-Communication.2.jpg

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Removing barriers helps build inclusive communities

The Boundary Sentinel | September 30, 2014, Written by Don McRae

The Government of B.C. has set out to become the most progressive place for people living with disabilities in Canada by 2024.

We believe that when barriers are removed, and people with disabilities are able to contribute to their communities, support their families, reach their dreams and goals, we all benefit.
The Government of B.C. has set out to become the most progressive place for people living with disabilities in Canada by 2024.

[Read the full story here]

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Murder-suicide of B.C. autistic teen by his mother reignites debate over caregiver support

National Post (April 25, 2014) – Written by Sarah Boesveld

The murder-suicide of an autistic British Columbia teenager and his mother — who said she was unable to care for him — has reignited the debate over support for caregivers and the right of the disabled to shape their own destinies.

When Angie Robinson killed her 16-year-old son Robert and then herself this month, she left a suicide note saying he had become unmanageable. The teen had grown too large and was violent against himself. Meanwhile, the resources available in her Prince Rupert community were inadequate.

“Angie loved him more than anything on Earth,” relative Ron Watson said. “The shock for us was that she took his life.” [Read the full story here]

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Distraught mother kills herself, and son with severe autism

Global News (April 25, 2014) – Reported by Amy Judd

Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 12.07.02 PMA story is emerging of a terrible family tragedy in Prince Rupert that underlines the extraordinary stress that can face the parents of children with autism and the lack of resources.

Angie Robinson’s 16-year-old son Robbie had autism, and had become violent and uncontrollable.

Respite care provided by the government wasn’t working, so Angie asked for a residential placement for Robbie, but was told nothing was available.

Earlier this month she killed her son and then herself. [Read the full story and watch the video here]

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