ANALYSIS | From shackles to the streets: How the mentally ill are treated in Yellowknife

CBC News | March 14, 2016, Written by Richard Gleeson

In a Yellowknife courtroom on Thursday afternoon a man from Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, appeared with his arms and legs shackled. The man had spent almost two months in prison, much of it in solitary confinement, some of it in a special suit designed to prevent him from hurting himself. (The prosecutor said he’s not a danger to the public.)

The 34-year-old was sentenced to time served on charges of assault and assaulting a peace officer and, less than an hour later, walked out of the courthouse alone to resume his life as a homeless person on the streets of Yellowknife.

It was a remarkable example of the shortcomings of mental health care when it’s mainly delivered by police, lawyers, judges and jailers. 

[Read the full story here]

This 34-year-old was brought into a Yellowknife courtroom in shackles. He was sentenced to time served and, less than an hour later, walked out of the courthouse alone to resume his life as a homeless person.

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